Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Ozark spring


I raise a hearty glass of an 06 St. James Norton to spring fire season, to prescribed fires planned for all over the state tomorrow--from pine woodlands around Ste. Genevieve to the relict post oak country of the upper Current River Hills. I toast bloodroots and trout lilies, to delicate little anemones and celandine poppies and blue-eyed Mary. May box turtles avoid automobile tires this spring, and may cool temperatures allow the bluebells to hold their elegant blooms into late April when the canoe outfitters open for the season. To spring!



6 comments:

travis said...

"i love the smell of burning ephemerals in the morning".

wait...damn....i don't like that smell at all.

Mike Whittemore said...

Nice pictures! Would you happen to know what the grass in this post is? I took pictures of the same looking plant last year in full bloom but haven't been able to ID it. I thought it could be pennsylvania sedge...

Allison Vaughn said...

But the ancient genetic memory of highly evolved systems throughout Missouri depend on a diverse fire regime of varying intensities, return intervals and seasons for their very viability....

Allison Vaughn said...

Mr. Whittemore--I believe it's Carex albicans var. albicans, but if I get it wrong, watch the comment string to see me get attacked. Cx pennsylvanica isn't as common in the Ozarks as it is in, say, North Missouri. It's on a sandstone bluff at Taum Sauk, but it's not the dominant sedge in most Ozark woodlands. Boy, deer hate it, too. I've seen woodlands that have nothing but pennsylvanica and fragile fern. Sad. Cool sedge, though. Anyway, if I got it wrong, the world will let me know very loudly. Thanks for reading. The photos are from Lane Spring, so sandstone abounds.

travis said...

i'm well versed in why and how to burn, and i love doing it. that, however, doesn't mean that i have to enjoy burning up the spring ephemerals that i wait 11 months to see!

Allison Vaughn said...

fair enough...happy spring to you!