Saturday, July 02, 2011

it's usually cooler in the dappled light of the woods







10 comments:

A.L. Gibson said...

The prairies, barrens and glades of Ohio are really starting to come to life as well. Have you ever seen the federally threatened Asclepias meadii before? Some botanist colleagues and I are planning a trek for early next June to see it.

Nickelplate said...

I've already started harvesting the wild blueberry patch. Do you happen to know the season for Serviceberry?

Allison Vaughn said...

Wild blueberries are incredibly delicious. No idea of serviceberry season...maybe someone else reading knows?

Travis said...

around st. louis, serviceberries come ripe around the end of may. they get hit really hard by birds, but this year they were barely touched at all. i suspect it was because even the frugivores were full of cicadas. the other tricky part is that, like any other tree or plant, some years they make very very little fruit even though they bloomed well. delicious though, taste like a cross between a grape and a blueberry.

Anonymous said...

That's sad to hear about the loss of diversity on our public prairies. I forget which one but you mentioned it in an earlier post. So specifically are you talking about the goofy patch burn grazing deal? It seems agencies dreaming that they can incorporate cattle as a surrogate for bison, even though their behavior is polar opposite (e.g. cattle seeking shade, bison dusting, etc). Did I get it right or are you referring to something else?

Scott Merritt said...

Is the population in the St. Francois on glade(s) that are burned regularly? Since you count every year, are you seeing any trends worth noting? Thanks

Allison Vaughn said...

Oh yes, all on burned sites. It's easy to burn glades down there when the woods won't burn. St. Francois Mts is the stronghold for the population of Meads in Missouri. And the glades are usually burned once every few years.

Allison Vaughn said...

You're right, it's the PBG issue that keeps me up at night...

Anonymous said...

Livestock can be used as a management tool, like an AK-47 assault rifle can be used as a
hunting tool. Perhaps theoretically possible, but only with very careful control of the tool. With
either the cow or the assault rifle on fully automatic, bad things happen. At least the gun cannot
walk around and do what a gun does by itself.
─Andy Kerr (2010)

James C. Trager said...

Interesting how tastes vary. To me, service berries taste like a blend of a good apple and a blackberry - a complex, rosaceous sort of flavor.