Saturday, March 17, 2012

Early, early spring wildflowers


The mad dash is on to see the spring ephemerals before the successive weeks of 76 to 80 degree temperatures encourage the oaks and hickories to leaf out and the delicate early wildflowers to burn up completely. One Missouri Native Plant Society chapter has cancelled the spring wildflower walks in April, aware that the bloom cycles are tracking two to three weeks early....








6 comments:

Laura Streckfuss said...

I spotted the top two flowers on this page over the weekend. Can you tell me the name of them?
Thank you.

Allison Vaughn said...

Hi Laura-you have buttercups and hoary puccoon in your area! Both lovely flowers, I'm still seeing them in bloom now, which is a more customary time for them. You must have some pretty dry woodlands for these guys to bloom, or a glade for the puccoon. Happy Spring!

Laura Streckfuss said...


Thank you so much! I found these in Washington State Park, Potosi, MO on Sunday.
There were fields of Blue-eyed Mary and Celandine Poppy -- so beautiful! I have never seen the Blue-eyed Mary before. Also seen was the Red Trillium, a red Catchfly, Bellwort, False Garlic and Wild Hyacinth. I have a couple more still to identify.

I stumbled across your blog -- so many beautiful flowers! I am just learning wild flowers. Thank you for your help.

Allison Vaughn said...

You hit the jackpot for spring wildflowers if you were able to catch the blue eyed Mary and Celandine poppy display at Washington! Best spring wildflower display in the state. Were the bluebells done? I have published the pages of spring wildflowers book produced by state parks with great illustrations and instructions on where you'll find them. Go to my blog and search for spring wildflower guide and it should direct you to the pages. The Denison wildflower guide available at most state parks is a great book for learning wildflowers in Missouri. Not only is it arranged by colors, but also by seasons! Your local library will also have a good copy. Make sure you visit St. Francois SP for good wildflowers, too! Especially the glades with Indian paintbrush. Spring in the Ozarks of Missouri is just magical!

Laura Streckfuss said...

I'm still learning, so was surprised to see such a difference in the blooming season at Castlewood & Washington State Parks. At Castlewood State Park, where there are fields and fields of Virginia Bluebells, they are done. Their peak was a couple weeks ago, only a few remain. The same weekend at Washington State Park bluebells were still blooming -- some just opening, and some just bloomed out but not fields of them -- but more than I thought since Castlewood was done.

I am having so much fun identifying the flowers. I will check out more of your blog and am interesting in obtaining a book for easy reference.

Thanks.

Allison Vaughn said...

Really great you're getting out to your local state parks! Washington's natural area where the bluebells and celandine poppies exist is a true forested condition, compared to Castlewood, which is much drier, more southeast facing exposure, etc. I highly recommend the Edgar Denison Wildflowers of Missouri guide. I think it's also available online through the Missouri State Parks website or at your local conservation nature center, if you're near one of those. Best wildflower guide for the Ozarks and the rest of Missouri.