Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Catastrophic: The Ozarks will not be the same.

It was roughly a year ago that I tracked down a climate change scientist and asked him to write an article for a newsletter I edit about his recent research in the change in rainfall patterns in the Ozarks. His elucidating study from Missouri State University showed that through time, rainfall events in the Big Barren Creek in the Current River watershed were increasing in intensity; higher rainfall amounts in a shorter duration are becoming the norm. The increased carbon amounts in the atmosphere are changing weather patterns. For most people with a basic understanding of science and the fact that we cannot possibly imagine that pumping as much carbon into the atmosphere from our coal-fired plants and tailpipes wouldn't have an impact on the atmosphere, this is not news. Nevertheless, climatologists have data.

The floodwaters are beginning to recede so we can finally grasp the damage caused by this catastrophe. I know many buildings have been washed downstream leaving only foundations and slabs. Rivers will not be ready for floaters by Memorial Day, and who knows how many outfitters will even still be around. Rivers have surely reshaped themselves, and we should accept that rather than attempt to control them. Last week's event may not be the last flood of this magnitude with the changing climate.

I know that we've passed the threshold on parts per billion of carbon in the atmosphere and now weather patterns are unpredictable, erratic at best. Climate change is resulting in increased turbulence in air traffic. Climate change is causing extreme weather patterns. I recommend reading Bill McKibben's Eaarth: Life on a New Planet for a good description of climate change's impacts.

Understanding and accepting climate change is not like a belief in the Catholic religion or the afterlife, climate change deniers possess instead a misunderstanding of the natural world. With this round of floods in the Ozarks, people have lost their lives, their homes, their way of life. Some folks are comparing this to the floods of 1993 and 1995 which resulted in large areas of the Missouri River floodplain to return to nature, areas taken out of farming. The effects of soil erosion, of debris, of failed septic systems, of exotic species, and of hazardous chemicals cannot even be fathomed at this time. Climate change is not debatable and at this point it's irreversible.

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