Saturday, May 13, 2017

May 10: Migratory Bird Day

When I woke up last week at 5:45am to the calls of a white-eyed vireo and a Tennessee warbler amidst the din of house wren chatter, I knew that my wintering white-throated sparrows had probably moved on overnight. Today is the big day for my local Audubon chapter where we fan out across the county to count birds. May 10th was officially Migratory Bird Day, so today is the official Big Day for listers. Aside from beefing up individual eBird lists, my chapter continues to collect data in designated circles just as we have for 50 years, data kept separately from eBird for our own edification.

This week, reports from the World Bird Sanctuary came in that the thrushes were thick in their migration mist nets. That white eye ring and lilting call of the Swainson's thrush are unmistakeable; I saw at least twenty of them on hikes Tuesday and Wednesday. Just as I was alerting my Audubon chapter that I had a new visitor in my yard, a dapper white-crowned sparrow, a fellow chapter member who lives on the block reported four of them in his yard. And then I saw a deceased one on my walk around the block with my schnauzer.

The weather radar has picked up the traveling birds on their nighttime northward migration; huge fields of disturbance show up all over Missouri and especially along the Mississippi River flyway. With the epic travels come also the big devastation of bird deaths due to collisions with buildings. Thousands of birds die during migration because of lighted buildings. Early versions of cell towers with certain kinds of lighting colors and patterns with guy wires also kill birds during migration. Proper siting and lighting on cell towers and turning off lights in high rise buildings can greatly diminish bird mortality, research shows.

The morning chorus usually begins with an American robin at 4:30 and then the yard erupts into hundreds of bird calls by sunrise. With the windows open I can detect the stranger birds, the ones who only stick around for a fleeting period of time. I have the welcome mat open to all of them, the ones passing through or staying a while during breeding season: clean water in the bird bath, seed and suet feeders still up, three hummingbird feeders, a canopied yard full of native flora and plenty of insect life, a brushpile and shrubby areas that the Northern cardinals have already set up a nest in, and nest boxes for the chickadees and house wrens. I do love seeing the annual visit of common yellowthroats in my urban backyard. Spring migration is well underway, a little later than in past years, but in full swing this month.

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