Monday, September 04, 2017

Streambanks in September

Ker-plunk! The walnut from high above fell swiftly and loudly into the water along the shoreline. Walnut and hickory leaves are all turning yellow and flying into the air, too, as Labor Day arrives. Last week, as the mild temperatures continued in the Ozarks because of the high pressure dome that tragically stalled out Hurricane Harvey in Texas, I started my streambank sampling. Cardinal flowers and ageratum were in full bloom, and the otters were out because there was no one else on the river that day. The morning cicadas hummed along while the temperatures escalated to a high of the low 80s. All of these things are signs that fall is near, though not officially until after my mid-September birthday. Shorter days, darker mornings, the slowing of the katydid chorus all mark this time of year. Seed ticks are, of course, still out and won't go away until the first frost. I welcome Indian summer.

My 45th birthday is in mid-September, a time to set new goals and objectives for the year ahead. This year I plan to spend my birthday with my childhood best friend who lives in Dauphin Island, Alabama (barring a tropical storm, depression or hurricane that week). She's the first of my friends to allow me to bring my motley crew of old dogs to stay in her mother-in-law cottage that rests behind her beachfront property. And so, in a couple of weeks we'll make the 12 hour drive with my 12 year old Bassett Hound, unknown-aged Phantom Schnauzer, and the perenially fussy 17 year old rat terrier, all three of whom were inherited after my mother's death in 2012. Three high maintenance dogs make travel quite the hassle, sometimes an impossibility, but paying for a full-time pet sitter is out of my financial reach. Unfortunately, they require a lot of maintenance, the exact opposite of my dart frogs. And so, we're packing up the pups, picking up some Pinckney Bend gin from New Haven and driving to Dauphin Island for four days of summer weather -beach weather- in mid-September.

With all of the blooming yellow composites ranging from Rudbeckia laciniata to Verbesina, the skippers and hummingbirds have a veritable feast. Glades are also awash in late summer wildflowers, especially Missouri coneflower and various species of blazing stars. But the streambanks, accessed by canoe via clean, fast-moving Ozark streams are hard to beat for botanical richness this time of year. The Niangua River from Bennett to Ho-Humm is particularly rich, a good 8 mile float trip that one can accomplish in a day quite easily, even if stopping to botanize and fish along the way. Kids are back in school, day lengths are shorter, the wood ducks are still swimming along the shorelines and kingfishers and bald eagles still feel like they're being chased downstream even if one isn't paddling their boat very hard.

Today is Labor Day and American Oystercatchers grace my Audubon calendar for the month of September. I haven't started thinking about the logistics of my Halloween costume which I feel certain, regardless of how great it is, will not win the work costume contest. I don't have any friends at work, and the green M&M wins every year. Same person, same costume, same lack of originality, same $50 gift card. Nevertheless, despite all of that I anticipate a trip towards St. James for Public House's Oktoberfest and the ability to pick up some Concords. Later in the month I retrieve my Norton juice so I can make my first batch of Norton wine!

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